Introduction nations, and as a result, most of

Introduction Conscription is the process of selecting and calling up individuals to serve in the military. The First World War originated in Europe and lasted for four years. During this period more than seventy million military personnel were mobilized in the global war . The European-based war involved conflicts among nations, and as a result, most of the military personnel were from Europe. Conscription occurred in Europe as well as other countries such as USA and Canada. Canada sent over five-hundred thousand soldiers and spent more than $1.65 billion in supplies, food, equipment and weapons . Even though conscription was aimed at ensuring Canada’s success in the war, it was not necessary.Conscription History in Canada When the First World War began, the English Canadians rushed to recruiting stations eager to represent Canada and Britain. Regardless, the French Canadians had little concern for Britain and often wondered why they should fight for the latter, yet they were Canadians. One in every twenty out of the four-hundred thousand who volunteered was French . Due to limited involvement of the French, the English were not satisfied with the lack of French contribution. As a result, the conscription led to increased tension and conflicts between the English and the French. In 1917 the body count was still rising as the war continued. The number of jobs in Canada increased and voluntary enlistment by the locals decreased. Before the conscription bill was enacted Robert Boden, the prime minister then assured the locals that there would be no conscription. Nonetheless, as a result of the inadequacy of Canadian volunteers, he established the Military Services Act in 1917 . This increased the distrust between the English and the French. Even though some English Canadians were against conscription, the number was small compared to that of the French Canadians. The French, including Wilfrid Laurier, the opposition leader, opined that conscription would result in the linguistic division in the North American nation . Borden failed to heed the French warnings and proceeded to enact the Military Services Act in 1917 which was also backed by the English-speaking legislators. Thus, the French had no opinion in the approval of the Military Services Act, and even though there was democracy in the country, during the war period, democracy was deferred until the war was over. To obtain additional backing for the conscription, the Military Voters Act was established and approved to permit the mothers and spouses of the English military personnel to vote for conscription. The votes in support of conscription came from the English while the farmers and the French voted against it. Linguistic Division    One of the major drawbacks of conscription was the linguistic division created between the English and the French. The English who voted for the conscription forced the French to fight for the country in the war. As a result, the tension between the French and the English increased. The lack of satisfaction from the French population led to riots. For instance, there were two days of unrest in Montreal after the conscription bill was passed. Also, riots emerged on the Easter weekend in 1918 when an individual named Joseph Mercier was apprehended for lacking his conscription registration papers . The arrest caused immense unrest as crowds gathered and looted the working quarters of the army registrar and destroyed the windows of the English shops. The French Canadians who were called up for military service were discriminated as they could not communicate with the other military personnel who were English. Additionally, the French soldiers could not be promoted to higher positions. Since the French were against conscription, the English viewed them as traitors as they were not assisting Britain. On the other hand, the French felt hoodwinked since they were coerced towards accepting conscription when they did not perceive themselves as English. As Wilfrid Laurier pointed out the linguistic conflict came into effect as a result of conscription.Lower Population               Conscription was caused by the war which occurred between 1914 and 1918. Most of the seventy million combatants involved in the war were men . As a result, conscription led to the reduction of the male population and the overall population of the North American nation. Over 650,000 Canadian men and women were involved in the war with more than sixty-six thousand giving their lives and more than 172,000 being serious injured . Nearly one of every ten individuals involved in the war did not return.Economical Consequence Before the First World War, the farming was booming in Canada. Conscription deprived the economy of regular output from farms. The male farmers were taken away from the country and sent to fight in Europe. The farm output reduced as the number of male farmers diminished. The family values and tradition also vanished as conscripted men went for long periods. The lack of men in the family and the society established a huge gap in the family structure. The Canadian families were not able to enjoy the quality family time. Without male farmers, the female spouses had to take care of the children as well as the farms by themselves.Additionally, male-dominated activities such as the construction of buildings and mining activities suffered as a result of conscription. The output from such sectors diminished considerably during the war period. The economy of the North American nation slumped as a result. The war also had considerable fiscal impacts as the war left Canada with a debt of over $1.6 billion .BenefitsRegardless, the conscription had some benefits. Conscription offered the military personnel especially the men a sense of pride and satisfaction. If one did not participate in the war, he or she was seen as cowardly. Since Canada had many young, eager men, conscription offered them an opportunity to go on adventures and at the same time serve their country. Additionally, conscription boosted Canada’s profile. With more military personnel involved in the war, Britain and Canada were seen as more powerful nations. Thus, other nations hesitated to attack the two nations. Canada’s appeal to foreigners increased as the country appeared stronger and desirable to live in. As a result, the Canadian economy was boosted due to conscription. The desirable nature of the country attracted immigrants from all over the world. Due to the nation’s success in the First World War, the immigration rate increased considerably in the 1920s. Conscription also saved Canada substantial cash resources since the country would have had to hire mercenaries. Conscription was also accompanied by the production of military products such as uniforms and guns. Jobs were created in the factories, and as a result, Canada’s economy improved. Conclusion           Even though conscription was aimed at ensuring Canada’s success in the war, it was not necessary. The drawbacks of conscription outweigh the benefits. The linguistic division between the French and the English increased as a result of conscription. The English were in support of conscription since they supported Britain’s effort in winning the war. On the other hand, the French did not share the same concern as the English. Resultantly, the French did not offer many contributions towards the war. The tension between the English and the French increased during the war period due to conscription. The conscription also forced the men to participate in the war. Some of these men did not return and as a result the number of babies born decreased. The population of the nation decreased considerably during the period. The male-dominated activities suffered immensely as the conscripted men were occupied in the war. The output from mining activities and construction projects decreased, and the economy slowed down substantially during the war period. The lack of men in the family and the society established a huge gap in the family structure. The Canadian families were not able to enjoy the quality family time. Without male farmers, the female spouses had to take care of the children as well as the farms by themselves. Some advantages were borne out of conscription. For instance, the sense of pride among men and Canadian locals increased as they fought to represent their country in the war. The conscription brought about savings in terms of substantial cash resources since the country would have had to hire mercenaries if it were not for conscription. Conscription was also accompanied by the production of military products such as uniforms and guns. Regardless, the drawbacks outnumber the benefits and conscription as a result was not necessary.