1. civil rights. He trusted that use of

1.      The letter was written by King in response to “A Call for Unity,” an announcement by a group of white clergymen from Alabama. In the announcement, the clergymen recognized the presence of across the board social shamefulness, however, kept up that equity was best served through the courts. The pastors were exceptionally condemning of King and his strategies for pursuing the battle for civil rights. He trusted that use of nonviolence was courageous act, not cowardly act. He trusted that nonviolence advanced comprehension of one’s adversary, and was not intended to disrespect him.

 

2.      He recognizes just laws and unjust laws and says that people ought to comply with the previous and resist the last mentioned.

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3.      He was not happy about it but letter he show this by other perspective. He thought that Jesus, prophet Amos, Apostle Paul… etc. were also called extremist then he was okay with it.  

 

4.      Dr. King admits his disappointment that white conservatives have not made this qualification, but rather considers that whites can’t genuinely comprehend “the deep groans and passionate yearnings” of blacks. He admits that a few whites in the South comprehend the reason and are focused on it, and records some of them. He lauds these individuals, a significant number of whom he discusses in speculations, for walking and enduring close by blacks who are making a move. (last paragraph on page 4)

 

His second disappointment, in the “white church and its leadership.”(first paragraph) He takes note of a few exemptions (giving some credit to a couple of the priests to whom the letter was tended to) however rehashes his general frustration. As a “minister of the gospel, who loves the church,”(second paragraph) Dr. Lord had initially anticipated that the white church would bolster the SCLC mission when it initially started in Montgomery quite a while prior. In any case, numerous church of the South has demonstrated “outright opponents,”(third paragraph) while an excessive number of others have “remained silent”(third paragraph) with some restraint and weakness. He had again trusted he would discover bolster from the white pastorate in Birmingham, yet has been frustrated once more(PG.5).